Contact

    Andrew Mackenzie, Prof. Dr.
    Phone: +49 351 4646-5900
    Fax: +49 351 4646-5902
    Phil King, Dr.
    Phone: +44 (0)1334 463067
    Fax: +44 (0)1334 463104

    Fermi surface of metallic delafossites

    Metallic delafossites are materials which show intriguing properties revealed over the past years. This includes ultra-high conductivity [1,2], unconventional magnetism [3], and the potential to host strongly spin-orbit coupled states at their surfaces and interfaces [4]. Structurally, they are layered materials with triangular in-plane lattices of transition metal atoms. This results in a quasi two-dimensional Fermi surface and very anisotropic transport properties.

    In this project, you will work in MPI-CPFS to perform high resolution quantum oscillation measurements on delafossite metals on our state-of-the-art laboratory setup which detects the magnetic torque of the crystals. This work will reveal the anisotropy of the Fermi surface and its deviation from a cylinder. You will also study the bulk electronic structure of the same materials using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) performed at synchrotron light sources and using a laboratory set-up in St Andrews. ARPES will give access to the in-plane shape of the bulk Fermi surface.

    Combining both techniques you will acquire a detailed knowledge of the Fermi surface. Comparing these results to band structure calculations will help uncover many-body interactions and their effects on the transport properties of this emerging family of transition-metal oxides.

    This project would suit a student with a background in solid state physics who is interested in performing experiments at very low temperature and advanced data analysis. You will spend part of your time performing research in MPI-CPFS Dresden, part in St Andrews, and part at international synchrotron light sources. Thus, a willingness to travel is an essential prerequisite.

    <p style="text-align: justify;">[left] (a) Quantum oscillations in the magnetic torque measured on the delafossite PdRhO<sub>2</sub> at different angles of the magnetic field. (b) Zoom on the oscillations at high field.<br />[right] Extracted warping parameters of the Fermi surface of PdRhO<sub>2</sub> [5].</p> Zoom Image

    [left] (a) Quantum oscillations in the magnetic torque measured on the delafossite PdRhO2 at different angles of the magnetic field. (b) Zoom on the oscillations at high field.
    [right] Extracted warping parameters of the Fermi surface of PdRhO2 [5].

    [1] P. Kushwaha, V. Sunko, P.J.W. Moll, L. Bawden, J.M. Riley, N. Nandi,
         H. Rosner, M.P. Schmidt, F. Arnold, E. Hassinger, T.K. Kim, M. Hoesch,
         A.P. Mackenzie, and P.D.C. King, Science Advances 1, 1500692 (2015)

    [2] P.J.W. Moll, P. Kushwaha, N. Nandi, B. Schmidt, A.P. Mackenzie,
         Science 351, 1061 (2016)

    [3] J.M. Ok, Y.J. Jo, K. Kim, T. Shishidou, E.S. Choi, H.-J. Noh, T. Oguchi,
         B.I. Min, and J.S. Kim, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 176405

    [4] V. Sunko, H. Rosner, P. Kushwaha, L. Bawden, O.J. Clark, J.M. Riley,
         D. Kasinathan, M.W. Haverkort, T.K. Kim, M. Hoesch, J. Fujii, I. Vobornik,
         A.P. Mackenzie, and P.D.C. King, Nature 549, 492

    [5] F. Arnold, M. Naumann, S. Khim, H. Rosner, V. Sunko, F. Mazzola,
         P.D.C. King, A. Mackenzie, and E. Hassinger, Phys. Rev. B 96, 075163 (2017)

     
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